Help for Heroes donations deluge crashes website after Woolwich murder

Military support charity inundated with calls and web traffic over soldier killed while wearing Help for Heroes top Help for Heroes has been swamped with donations, leading to its website crashing, after Drummer Lee Rigby was murdered while wearing one of the charity’s tops. Supporters of the military charity took to social networks in an attempt to boost its coffers after the 25-year-old was killed in Woolwich, south-east London, on Wednesday

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Help for Heroes donations deluge crashes website after Woolwich murder

Woolwich attack victim named as Lee Rigby

Man, 25, killed in Woolwich was drummer in 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers and father of two-year-old boy The soldier who was killed in the knife attack in Woolwich has been named as Drummer Lee Rigby, of the 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. The Ministry of Defence released his details on Thursday, a day after the stabbing near the barracks in south London where he had been stationed.

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Woolwich attack victim named as Lee Rigby

Woolwich attack victim was serving soldier, police confirm

Officials have contacted relatives of dead man, who is believed to have served in Afghanistan Scotland Yard has confirmed that the victim of the Woolwich machete attack was a serving soldier. Though he has not yet been formally named, the Guardian understands he had undertaken one six-month tour of Afghanistan and was stationed at the Royal Artillery Barracks in Woolwich

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Woolwich attack victim was serving soldier, police confirm

Afghan interpreters’ resettlement scheme ‘doesn’t go far enough’

Concerns raised over proposals that allow candidates to settle in Britain only if they have 12 months’ continuous service Lawyers representing Afghan interpreters have welcomed the news that about half of them are to be given settlement rights in the UK in recognition for risking their lives for British troops but expressed concerns that the reworked package does not go far enough. Under the proposals, any interpreters who have put themselves in physical danger working outside British military bases will be offered a resettlement package if they have been working for the UK forces for more than 12 months at the point of their redundancy. It is estimated that about half the interpreters working for the UK forces – roughly 600 – will qualify.

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Afghan interpreters’ resettlement scheme ‘doesn’t go far enough’

Princes William and Harry open new Help for Heroes centre – video

The Duke of Cambridge and his brother, Prince Harry, open four new Help for Heroes recovery centres while visiting Tedworth House in Wiltshire

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Princes William and Harry open new Help for Heroes centre – video