Trident: the nuclear jobcentre | Richard Norton-Taylor

Treating Trident as an employment scheme will leave Britain ill equipped for the real threat: terrorism Fifty years ago this week Britain signed an agreement whereby its ability to fire nuclear weapons became entirely dependent on the US. Under the Polaris Sales Agreement , heralded as a pillar of the “special relationship”, the US agreed to supply Britain with nuclear ballistic missiles, their launch tubes, and their fire control system. Britain would build the submarines at Barrow and, with US help, the nuclear warheads at Aldermaston.

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Trident: the nuclear jobcentre | Richard Norton-Taylor

Labour is right to support Trident | Angela Smith and John Woodcock

A nuclear disarmament policy might look fine on a Lib Dem leaflet but it would cost our party and the country dear As the next election gets closer, a steady stream of commentators have speculated that Labour could go back to the days of advocating unilateral nuclear disarmament by abandoning the programme to build the new submarines that will carry Britain’s deterrent . Some hope Ed Miliband will be different to the succession of Labour leaders who believed unilateralism would leave the UK more vulnerable to a future nuclear threat while doing precious little to advance the vitally important cause of global non-proliferation and disarmament.

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Labour is right to support Trident | Angela Smith and John Woodcock

Why I’ll be protesting against a Trident replacement at Aldermaston | Natalie Bennett

The cost of replacing a dangerous and immoral nuclear missile system could pay for green jobs and university places On Easter Monday – or April Fools’ Day, depending on your preference – I am joining people from all areas of Britain to protest against one of the coalition’s greatest potential follies. Thousands of people, including Green party MEP Keith Taylor , members of CND and I, will be at Aldermaston for a protest rally against the Trident nuclear weapons system and its suggested replacement.

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Why I’ll be protesting against a Trident replacement at Aldermaston | Natalie Bennett

British dead and wounded in Afghanistan, month by month

What is the human cost of the war in Afghanistan for British forces? As British troop deaths reach 441, these are the latest figures – including the most recent wounded and amputation statistics • Get the data • Amputation statistics explainer • Afghanistan civilian casualties • Interactive guide With the latest deaths caused by the war in Afghanistan, the total number of British troop fatalities during the conflict now stands at 441. The number of British deaths in Afghanistan is now much higher than Iraq and even the Falklands conflict .

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British dead and wounded in Afghanistan, month by month

1975: Sea King helicopter heralds new era in search and rescue

A chopper that was tasked for anti-submarine operations is now deployed ‘for the greater good’ In 1975, the sinking of the cargo ship the Lovat with the loss of 11 lives in rough seas off Penzance raised questions about the effectiveness of Whirlwind helicopters for use in sea rescues. The Guardian leader column below was published in the aftermath of the Lovat tragedy and echoed the growing call for the more powerful Sea King helicopters to be used instead.

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1975: Sea King helicopter heralds new era in search and rescue