Make the change with Devon Country Council

Looking for a change of career? Use your transferable skills to make a difference.

As an ex-serviceman, you have a lot of transferable skills – a talent for communication and problem solving, attention to detail and a strong work ethic – that would work in a range of different industries. But what if you wanted to use your career change to make a difference to people’s lives? A career that takes a certain type of person, rather than being about qualifications or specific experience? A career that sees you dedicate your time to helping others? Then maybe it’s time to consider a career to be proud of. A career in care and support work.

It’s not for everyone. Is it for you?

As a care and support worker you would be supporting people to live as independently as possible in their own homes. You would support people with everyday things from assisting with domestic jobs and personal care, to involving people in social activities and helping them to access services in their community. You’d gain an enormous sense of personal satisfaction through helping people to achieve their goals and live the lives they choose. You’d be working in a positive and supportive environment that encourages and values your contribution.

So what’s it like to be a care and support worker? John Powell wanted to make a real difference to people’s lives; he entered the healthcare profession so he would be a good role model for his children. John started working at the local hospital as a healthcare assistant on the emergency medical unit. “It was so different to anything I’d done before,” said John. “I found it really rewarding. I was making someone’s life better, it was tough, but a real privilege. The role was fast-paced and exciting and every day was completely different.”

It’s never too late

Jean Pearn started her career in care aged 48. “The role is special; knowing that my input has given another person greater quality of life,” says Jean. “If you are thinking of a career in care but wondering if it’s too late, my advice is it’s never too late! It’s possible to start a career in care at any age with no previous experience or qualifications.  I started at 48 and look what I’ve achieved; it’s one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done!”

If you’re interested in starting a career in care, visit www.proudtocaredevon.org.uk for more information and to hear from other people about their worthwhile careers.

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